women support  accused of Yakku Adav killing

   Akku Yadav and his gang terrorized the village of Kasturba Nagar years with numerous killings and gang rapes. Though he had 24 cases against him he always got bail from the paid off police. Finally in 2004…

         ..200 Women killed Mass Rapist Monster

Trial in Akku Yadav murder case finally begins   Oct 23, 2012

NAGPUR: The much awaited trail in the sensational murder case of history sheeter Akku Yadav began in the fast track court of magistrate P M Junedar on Monday. Eight years and two months ago, Akku Yadav was lynched by a mob of women inside Nyay Mandir. Twenty one people were made accused in the case. The case has around 85 witnesses.

On first day, panch witness Deepak Devghare was questioned by the public prosecutor Ravindra Bhoyar. Devghare said he was called as a witness in the case for around ten times and he had signed the panchnama. He said that he saw a constable’s uniform was recovered from the spot. “Police checked accused Sumedh Karwade, Raju Ghodge and Nilesh Humne before me. I was taken at their house from where the police seized their clothes,” he said.However, on being questioned by defence lawyer R K Tiwari, he said he was working as peon in CID in 2004 and he was witness in many of their cases. He said when he entered the court room, he saw the blood stains on the wall and the cupboard. He claimed the blood stains were also seen on one of the accused Sumedh Choudhary’s clothes.
http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2012-10-23/nagpur…

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this is what happened

After recent events in India, this is an immensely powerful piece from 2005. I suggest you read it all. It comes with a very strong trigger warning for rape, however..

“Arrest us all” [TW] – 200 Indian women kill the man who ordered and carried out their rape (2005)

When hundreds of women descended on Nagpur district court armed with knives, stones and chilli powder, within minutes the man who raped them lay dead. Raekha Prasad reports (2005)

A year ago Usha Narayane was about to embark on a new life. A call-centre worker with a diploma in hotel management, she was 25 and about to tra

As usual police had to find a scapegoat. They charged Usha Narayane, the most educated and vocal among these slum dwellers. Among the charges reportedly leveled against Usha were some of India’s most serious offences, including crimes amounting to treason. Usha claims, she “was not in the court when the killing took place, but was in the slum collecting signatures for a mass complaint against Akku Yadav. Police accuse me of planning the murder and that I started it. They made me a scapegoat. I have been singled out because I was the most vociferous critic of the police. Yes, my being educated did inspire the community” she admits.Years passed and case is still to be heard according to some source. But some 4th estate sources from Nagpur informs that case is closed. But the world has not heard of the last word on Usha Narayane. Reportedly, she is unrepentant. May be somebody, somewhere has to take up her case as a model for Stree Shakthi. She is not merely woman but a Dalit at that. She deserves to be an icon among those so called emancipated women haggling for political power and more power.

As usual police had to find a scapegoat. They charged Usha Narayane, the most educated and vocal among these slum dwellers. Among the charges reportedly leveled against Usha were some of India’s most serious offences, including crimes amounting to treason. Usha claims, she “was not in the court when the killing took place, but was in the slum collecting signatures for a mass complaint against Akku Yadav. Police accuse me of planning the murder and that I started it. They made me a scapegoat. I have been singled out because I was the most vociferous critic of the police. Yes, my being educated did inspire the community” she admits.
Years passed and case is still to be heard according to some source. But some 4th estate sources from Nagpur informs that case is closed. But the world has not heard of the last word on Usha Narayane. Reportedly, she is unrepentant. She deserves to be an icon among those so called emancipated women haggling for political power and more power.

vel north from her home in the centre of India to begin a managerial job in a hotel in Punjab. The job would transport her not only geographically but also socially.Like her neighbours, Usha Narayane is a dalit, an “untouchable”, at the bottom of the caste ladder. Schooling and literacy are rare among the women of Kasturba Nagar, the slum neighbourhood in the city of Nagpur where she grew up. She was unmarried, preferring to work and study. Yet nobody resented her success. Instead, they had high hopes for the girl. But Narayane went nowhere. Today, she is in her family’s one-room, windowless home, awaiting trial for murder.

At 3pm on August 13 2004, Akku Yadav was lynched by a mob of around 200 women from Kasturba Nagar. It took them 15 minutes to hack to death the man they say raped them with impunity for more than a decade. Chilli powder was thrown in his face and stones hurled. As he flailed and fought, one of his alleged victims hacked off his penis with a vegetable knife. A further 70 stab wounds were left on his body. The incident was made all the more extraordinary by its setting. Yadav was murdered not

in the dark alleys of the slum, but on the shiny white marble floor of Nagpur district court.

Laughed at and abused by the police when they reported being raped by Yadav, the women took the law into their own hands. A local thug, Yadav and his gang had terrorised the 300 families of Kasturba Nagar for more than a decade, barging into homes demanding money, shouting threats and abuse.

Residents say he murdered at least three neighbours and dumped their bodies on railway tracks. They had reported his crimes to the police dozens of times. Each time he was arrested, he was granted bail.

But it was rape that Yadav used to break and humiliate the community. A rape victim lives in every other house in the slum, say the residents of Kasturba Nagar. He violated women to control men, ordering his henchmen to drag even girls as young as 12 to a nearby derelict building to be gang-raped.

In India, even to admit to being raped is taboo, yet dozens of Yadav’s victims reported the crime. But the 32-year-old was never charged with rape. Instead, the women say, the police would tell him who had made the reports and he would come after them. According to residents, the police were hand-in-glove with Yadav: he fed the local officers bribes and drink, and they protected him.

When one 22-year-old reported being raped by Yadav, the police accused her of having an affair with him and sent her away. Several others were sent away after being told: “You’re a loose woman. That’s why he raped you.”

Nagpur is counted among India’s fastest-growing cities. Yet the experience of the women of Kasturba Nagar is a parallel tale of how everyday life in India’s back streets is stuck in the past. Splashed across the country’s news- papers, the gory image of Yadav’s blood on the courtroom floor was a lesson in the consequences of a state unable to protect the weak and the vulnerable.

After Yadav’s murder, powerful voices were raised supporting the lynch mob. Prominent lawyers issued a statement saying the women should not be treated as the accused, but as the victims. One retired high court judge even congratulated the women. “In the circumstances they underwent, they were left with no alternative but to finish Akku. The women repeatedly pleaded with the police for their security. But the police failed to protect them,” said Justice Bhau Vahane.

Two weeks before the lynching, Yadav came to Narayane’s house on several successive days, threatening to throw acid on her and rape her. He targeted her, she says, because she was outspoken and her brother-in-law, a lawyer, had verbally stood up to Yadav. “He raped only poor people whom he thought wouldn’t go and tell, or if they did, wouldn’t be listened to. But he made a big mistake in threatening me. People felt that if I were attacked, no woman would ever be safe.”

Although Narayane has been charged with Yadav’s murder, she claims she was not at the court when it took place but in the slum collecting signatures for a mass complaint against him. Among the charges levelled against her are some of India’s most serious offences, including “anti- nationalist” crimes amounting to treason. “The cops say I planned the murder; that I started it. They have to make someone a scapegoat,” she says. She believes she has been singled out because she has been the police’s most vociferous critic. Her education gave her the confidence tEveryone knew Usha Narayane had orchestrated the murder but she wasn’t in court that day and though she was arrested nobody could prove her involvement.  The woman had decided if they all stabbed him no one wound – or one woman – could be said to have killed him.hat inspired the community to act, she says.

In the week before the lynching, people started to talk about taking action against Yadav. He disappeared, sensing boiling anger. Narayane and her brother-in-law bypassed the local officers and went straight to the deputy commissioner. He gave the family a safe house for a night and promised to search for him.

On August 6, hundreds of residents smashed his empty house to rubble. By evening they heard Yadav had “surrendered” and was in custody. “The police had said he would be in danger if he came back. They suggested he surrender into their care for his own safety.”

When you ask the police why Yadav was not in jail they say that he was arrested many times but was released on bail. What can the police do about this? The people of Kasturba Nagar tell a different story. They tell you that he was never arrested because he acted as a police informant so when, a few days before his murder, his house was torn down by an enraged mob he surrendered to the police thinking he would be safer in jail. Neither he nor the police seem to have realized that the women were enraged enough to seek him out even in custody. The best thing that could happen now is for the police to stop treating Akku Yadav's case as murder because even if it comes to court which judge is going to send 400 women to jail? Again, privately, the police admit this but claim that as upholders of the law they are forced to pursue the case. A shame because what they need to pursue instead are serious efforts to rebuild their credibility with the people of Kasturba Nagar who lost faith in their ability to uphold the law long ago. It was Akku Yadav who took their place and upheld the law as he saw it by using terror as his weapon. He was a monster who should have been in jail years ago. If he had been, women of Kasturba Nagar would not have needed to take the law into their own hands and become both Judge and executioner.

When you ask the police why Yadav was not in jail they say that he was arrested many times but was released on bail. What can the police do about this? The people of Kasturba Nagar tell a different story. They tell you that he was never arrested because he acted as a police informant so when, a few days before his murder, his house was torn down by an enraged mob he surrendered to the police thinking he would be safer in jail. Neither he nor the police seem to have realized that the women were enraged enough to seek him out even in custody. The best thing that could happen now is for the police to stop treating Akku Yadav’s case as murder because even if it comes to court which judge is going to send 400 women to jail? Again, privately, the police admit this but claim that as upholders of the law they are forced to pursue the case. A shame because what they need to pursue instead are serious efforts to rebuild their credibility with the people of Kasturba Nagar who lost faith in their ability to uphold the law long ago. It was Akku Yadav who took their place and upheld the law as he saw it by using terror as his weapon. He was a monster who should have been in jail years ago. If he had been, women of Kasturba Nagar would not have needed to take the law into their own hands and become both Judge and executioner.

The next day he was due to appear at the city’s district court and 500 slum residents gathered. As Yadav arrived, one of his henchmen tried to pass him knives wrapped in a blanket under the noses of the police. After the women protested, the accomplice was arrested and Yadav taken back into custody, but not before he threatened to return and teach every woman in the slum a lesson.

Hearing that Yadav was likely to get bail yet again, when he returned to court, the women decided to act. “It was not calculated,” Narayane says. “It was not a case that we all sat down and calmly planned what would happen. It was an emotional outburst. The women decided that, if necessary, they’d go to prison, but that this man would never come back and terrorise them.”

On the day of Yadav’s hearing, 200 women came to the court armed with vegetable knives and chilli powder. As he walked in, Yadav spotted one of the women he had raped. He called her a prostitute and threatened to repeat the crime against her. The police laughed. She took off her sandal and began to hit him, shouting, “We can’t both live on this Earth together. It’s you or me.”

It was a rallying cry to an incensed mob. Soon, he was being attacked on all sides. Knives were drawn and the two terrified officers guarding him ran away. Within 15 minutes, Yadav was dead on the courthouse floor. But his death has not brought the women peace. Five were immediately arrested, then released following a demonstration across the city. Now every woman living in the slum has claimed responsibility for the murder. They say no one person can take the blame: they have told the police to arrest them all.

But it is Narayane who is in limbo as she waits for her case to be heard. “After the murder, society’s eyes opened: the police’s failings came to light. That has irritated them. The police see me as a catalyst for the exposure and want to nip it in the bud.”

They face a fight. Narayane is loudly unrepentant. “I’m not scared. I’m not ashamed,” she says. “We’ve done a good thing for society. We will see whether society repays us”.

this section cross posted from http://feimineach.com…  with thanks

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