Tag Archive: Indigenous People


”There are always oil spills in the Amazon. Because the criminal predator oil companies care nothing for the environment, the health of the people or even the genocide of whole indigenous nations. this has been going on for 50 years, the biggest crimes being the 1000′s of spills and abandoned chemical lakes created over 30 years by Texaco (now Chevron) which even today uses it’s massive wealth to defend its impunity. Today while science proves that 60% of fossil fuels will have to stay in the ground to save us from catastrophic climate change, the race to extract continues worse than ever, with the connivance of ourselves, the 1st world fossil fuel junkies!

no more spills

Amazon oil spill has killed tons of fish, sickened native people

10380656_663357330412494_142501327768392504_oBarbara Fraser
Dead fish from an oil spill in the Peruvian Amazon are mixed with oil-covered twigs gathered by local residents. Fish are vital to the villagers’ diet and income. Reporters discovered there had been another smaller oil spill only 4 days before which the company claims was a ”normal maintenance procedure”

By Barbara Fraser     Environmental Health News     July 23, 2014

CUNINICO, Peru – On the last day of June, Roger Mangía Vega watched an oil slick and a mass of dead fish float past this tiny Kukama Indian community and into the Marañón River, a major tributary of the Amazon.

Community leaders called the emergency number for Petroperu, the state-run operator of the 845-kilometer pipeline that pumps crude oil from the Amazon over the Andes Mountains to a port on Peru’s northern coast Continue reading

Xingu rising

Indigenous Peoples Launch New Occupation on Belo Monte Dam Site

 

By: International Rivers, Amazon Watch and CIMI   Friday, May 3, 2013

Seven tribes from the Xingu and Tapajós rivers protest violations of right to prior consultation in construction of Amazonian dams

Altamira, Pará, Brazil: Approximately 200 indigenous people affected by the construction of large hydroelectric dams in the Amazon launched an occupation yesterday at one of the main construction sites of the Belo Monte Dam complex in the municipality of Victoria de Xingu.

They demand that the Brazilian government adopt effective legislation on prior consultations with indigenous peoples regarding projects that affect their lands and livelihoods. Until then, they are demanding the immediate suspension of all construction, technical studies and police operations related to dams along the Xingu, Tapajós and Teles Pires rivers. Shock troops of the Military Police were awaiting the indigenous protestors when they arrived at the Belo Monte Dam site, but they were unable to impede the occupation. Continue reading

Tipnis Resiste

Bolivian government manages to split resistance to highway with a spurious consultation process..
Friday December 7

Often dubbed ‘the most beautiful place on Earth’, Isiboro Sécure (TIPNIS in Spanish), is the crown jewel of the Bolivian Amazon, famous for its huge trees, astonishing wildlife, and fresh water. Its incredible natural and cultural significance have earned it the status, until now, of a double protected area — as a National Park and an indigenous reservoir. Continue reading

Peru and Ecuadcanna_5or Set to Auction Off More Amazon for Oil

Posted by Darrin Mortenson on Monday, 29 October 2012 in Environmental Justice and Human Rights

Even as indigenous people struggle to cope with current levels of contamination and illness caused by years of oil production in the Amazon, the governments of Peru and Ecuador are preparing to sell off even more Amazonian territory to the oil industry in coming months.

Starting in November, Peru’s state-run leasing agency Petroperu plans to start auctioning licenses to 36 new oil blocks for exploration, 19 of them in the northern region of Loreto. Just across the border, Ecuador is set to lease at least 13 blocks on or near waterways that eventually flow south into Peru and join the Amazon River.

Many of the blocks overlap or abut protected areas and indigenous territories and threaten the forests and rivers that indigenous people and other river people depend on for their lives.

Indigenous groups are rallying to stop their governments’ plans, and some talk of making a stand for a total moratorium on all exploration until both countries come up with a regional environmental plan. Continue reading

27 July 2012

Ecuador: Inter-American Court ruling marks key victory for Indigenous Peoples

A regional human rights court has come down in favour of the Sarayaku Indigenous community in the Ecuadorian Amazon in what Amnesty International has called a key victory for Indigenous Peoples.

The Inter-American Court of Human Rights (IACHR) ruling in Sarayaku v. Ecuador, ends a decade-long legal battle by the Sarayaku Indigenous People – backed by their lawyers Mario Melo and the Centre for Justice and International Law (CEJIL)
CGC, partnering with ConocoPhillips, felled forests, destroyed a cultural site, and drilled hundreds of boreholes for seismic surveying on tribal lands despite never gaining permission to do so from the community. As tensions rose, the Ecuadorian government set up military camps on indigenous land. Continue reading

 Brazil to Open Indigenous Lands to Dams, Mining, and Military Bases in “National Interest”http://news.mongabay.com/2012/0726-brazil-indigenous-directive.html

inShare print

Jeremy Hance
mongabay.com
July 26, 2012

   

Three engineers are being held hostage by the Juruna and Arara indigenous tribes as tensions rise over the on-going construction of the Belo Monte dam in Brazil, reports the Indigenous rights NGO Amazon Watch. The company building the dam, Norte Energia, has confirmed that three of its employees were being held against their will. Tribal groups in the region say the massive dam will upend their way of life, and that construction is already making travel along the Xingu river difficult.

The $11 billion Belo Monte is expected to flood more than 40,000 hectares of rainforest, displacing 16,000 people according to the government and 40,000 according to critics. Eighty percent of the Xingu’s flow will be rerouted, impacting fish migrations and perhaps even sending some species into extinction. If completed, the dam will be the world’s third largest. Continue reading

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