China: Take The Streets. Rioting spreads.

Wave of Violent Protests, Rioting, Bombings Hits China; Expect More Riots When China’s Credit Bubble Pops, Exposing Mountains of Fraud Protests are not uncommon in China. However, most protests have been in rural areas where farmers have had their land stolen by bureaucrats and property developers.

The last few weeks have been different. Several large urban areas have seen protests against corruption. A wave of violent unrest in urban areas of China over the past three weeks is testing the Communist Party’s efforts to maintain control over an increasingly complex and fractious society, forcing it to repeatedly deploy its massive security forces to contain public anger over economic and political grievances.

In the latest disturbance, armed police were struggling to restore order in a manufacturing town in southern China Monday after deploying tear gas and armored vehicles against hundreds of migrant workers who overturned police cars, smashed windows and torched government buildings there the night before. The protests, which began Friday night in Zengcheng, in the southern province of Guangdong, followed serious rioting in another city in central China last week, plus bomb attacks on government facilities in two other cities in the past three weeks, and ethnic unrest in the northern region of Inner Mongolia last month.

Antigovernment protests have become increasingly common in China in recent years, according to the government’s own figures, but they have been mainly confined to rural areas, often where farmers have been thrown off their land by property developers and local officials. The latest unrest, by contrast, involves violent protests from individuals and large crowds in China’s cities, where public anger is growing over issues including corruption and police abuses.

Protests in China have been occurring at an increasing rate. This is in spite of the fact the Chinese economy has been growing at 10% a year for a decade. What happens when China’s growth slows to 4%?

Continue reading here..http://libcom.org/news/riots-china-14062011

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