Breaking the media gag in Western Sahara

‘Equipe Media’ are a group of youths in Western Sahara dedicated to  exposing the oppression and pillage by the occupying Moroccan State

Western Sahara was seized by Morocco when the Spanish withdrew in 1975
Western Sahara was seized by Morocco when the Spanish withdrew in 1975
photo freon rooftop by Equipe Media shows Moroccan police attacking women when dispersing Saharawi demo.
photo from rooftop by Equipe Media shows Moroccan police attacking women when dispersing Saharawi demo.

Moroccan officials charged against demonstrators, particularly against women, during a protest in Laayoune in images captured by Equipe Media from the roof of one of the surrounding buildings. Credit: Courtesy of Equipe Media.

“The roofs are essential for us because only from there can we document the brutality of the Moroccan police,” explains Ettanji . This 26 year old is one of the leaders of Equipe Media, a group of Saharawi volunteers struggling to break the information blockade imposed by Rabat on Western Sahara. “There are no news agencies and foreign journalists are denied access, and are even deported if visiting the area,” added the activist.

The Spanish Luis de Vega is one of the many foreign reporters who can corroborate that testimony. Not surprisingly, De Vega was expelled in 2010 after spending eight years as correspondent in Morocco, and declared ‘persona non grata’ by the Moroccan authorities .

Une manifestation pro-indépendance sans précédent depuis plusieurs décennies s’est déroulée le 05/06/2013 à Laâyoune, la plus grande ville du Sahara occidental, ex-colonie espagnole contrôlée par le Maroc, ont rapporté lundi plusieurs médias marocains.
Une manifestation pro-indépendance sans précédent depuis plusieurs décennies s’est déroulée a 2013 à Laâyoune, la plus grande ville du Sahara occidental, ex-colonie espagnole contrôlée par le Maroc, ont rapporté lundi plusieurs médias marocains.

“The question of Western Sahara is one of the most sensitive for journalists in Morocco and those who dare to cover it inevitably face the consequences,” de Vega told IPS by telephone from Madrid.

This year, marks four decades since in 1975 this territory the size of Britain was annexed by Rabat following the withdrawal of Spain from its last colony, Western Sahara.

Since the ceasefire signed in 1991 between Morocco and the Polisario Front, Rabat has controlled most of the territory, including the entire Atlantic coast and oil and mineral

ASKAPENA collective deported again
 Askapena ha informado de que la Policía marroquí ha procedido esta tarde a la expulsión del Sahara Occidental de cinco brigadistas vascos que se habían llegado ayer martes a El Aaiun. http://www.naiz.eus/eu/actualidad/noticia/20150819/askapena-denuncia-que-marruecos-ha-expulsado-del-sahara-a-cinco-brigadistas

Aug.2015. Askapena is a Basque collective who have twice journeyed to Sahara to try and break the ‘Death Silence’ and been deported both times. Askapena ha informado de que la Policía marroquí ha procedido esta tarde a la expulsión del Sahara Occidental de cinco brigadistas vascos que se habían llegado ayer martes a El Aaiun. http://www.naiz.eus/eu/actual

However, the UN still considers Western Sahara as a “territory unfinished process of decolonization”.

Mohamed Mayara

Mohamed Mayara, also a member of Equipe Media, accompanies Ettanji to take photos from the roofs. Like most of his colleagues, Mayara acknowledges having been arrested and tortured several times. In any case, the constant harassment does not appear to have undermined his enthusiasm, though he admits in to limitations inherent in any illegal activity.

“We created the first group in 2009, but most of us work on pure instinct. We have no training for what we’re learning in the journalism field, “he said. the Saharawi was born in the year of the invasion and writes the reports and press releases in English and French.

His father he says, disappeared in the hands of the Moroccan army two months after his birth. He has not heard from him since.

Hayat Khatari

Hayat Khatari, correspondent in occupied Western Sahara SADR TV,  The young activist was detained remember last time in December 2014. Unlike the Lhaissan Mahmood, her predecessor in SADR TV, Khatari was released shortly after her arrest. "We have to work hard and take many risks in order to counter the propaganda of Rabat on everything that happens here," says Khatari.
Hayat Khatari, correspondent in occupied Western Sahara SADR TV,  The young activist was last detained in December 2014. Unlike the Lhaissan Mahmood, her predecessor in SADR TV, Khatari was released shortly after her arrest. “We have to work hard and take many risks in order to counter the propaganda of Rabat on everything that happens here,” says Khatari.

Sustained repression

Most Saharawis are currently living in refugee camps in Tindouf in western Algeria.

Media members say Equipe maintain a “fluid communication” with the Saharawi Arab Democratic Republic (SADR), established authority there and claiming a territory of 75 percent is occupied by Morocco.

In addition to sharing all the material, also they work side by side with Khatari Hayat, the only journalist who reported openly to the SADR TV, which broadcasts from Tindouf. At 24, Khatari remembers who started work in 2010 after the incidents of protest camp Gdeim Izzik the outskirts of Laayoune. Originally built as a peaceful protest camp, Gdeim Izzik led to riots that spread to other Saharan cities when it was dismantled by Moroccan forces on November 8.

Western analysts, like the American Noam Chomsky, attribute the origin of the “Arab Spring” to Laayoune, and not to Tunisia, as commonly established.a-hasssanna31012015bilbao1

Al Lhaissan

In a report published in March, Reporters Without Borders includes the case of Al Lhaissan. The activist was released on bail on 25 February after eight months in prison for covering a demonstration. Still he is awaiting trial on charges of participating in an “armed gathering” obstructing public roads, damage to property and assaulting security officers during the course of their work.

Jean-Louis Perez and Pierre Chautard

In the same report, Reporters Without Borders also condemns the detention and deportation in February of French journalists Jean-Louis Perez and Pierre Chautard. Both worked on a documentary for France 3 television channel on the economic and social situation in Morocco, until they were arrested and put on a flight to Paris after Serles confiscated all their material. The arrest took place in the Moroccan Association for Human Rights, one of the main humanitarian organizations in the country but that the Interior Ministry accused of “undermining the work of the security forces.”

Likewise, other organizations like Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch reported on a constant violations of human rights suffered by the Saharawi people at the hands of Morocco in recent decades.405899_608131555865161_2093885859_n

Despite repeated phone calls and emails, the Moroccan authorities refused to respond to questions from IPS on these and other human rights violations allegedly committed in Western Sahara.

Back in the center of Laayoune Equipe Media activists seem to have found what they sought. The owners of the apartment where they want to make photos are a Sahrawi family, how could it be otherwise. “I never would ask a Moroccan such thing,” says Ettanji from the roof, without taking his eyes from the scene of the next protest. The exact date and place, he says, can not reveal them “for obvious reasons”.

IPS

Full Text (español): http://www.lahaine.org/rompiendo-el-bloqueo-informativo-en

Rompiendo el bloqueo informativo en Sahara Occidental

x Karlos Zurutuza
 Agentes marroquíes cargan contra manifestantes, en especial contra mujeres, durante una protesta en El Aaiún, en imágenes captadas por Equipe Media desde la azotea de uno de los edificios circundantes. Crédito: Cortesía de Equipe Media

Ahmed Ettanji busca una vivienda para alquilar en algún edificio en el centro de El Aaiún, a 1.100 kilómetros al sur de Rabat. Se conforma con que tenga una azotea con vistas a la plaza que acogerá la próxima manifestación prosaharaui.

“Las azoteas son esenciales para nosotros porque solo desde allí podemos documentar la brutalidad de la policía marroquí”, explica Ettanji a IPS. Este joven de 26 años es uno de los líderes del Equipe Media, un grupo de voluntarios saharauis que luchan por romper el bloqueo informativo impuesto por Rabat sobre Sahara Occidental.

“Aquí no hay agencias de noticias y a los periodistas extranjeros se les niega el acceso, e incluso se les deporta si visitan la zona”, añade el activista.

El español Luis de Vega es uno de los muchos informadores extranjeros que pueden corroborar dicho testimonio. No en vano, De Vega fue expulsado en 2010 tras pasar ocho años de corresponsal en Marruecos, y declarado persona non grata por las autoridades marroquíes.

“La cuestión del Sahara Occidental es uno de los temas más delicados para los periodistas en Marruecos y los que se atreven a cubrirlo se enfrentan inevitablemente a las consecuencias”, explicó De Vega a IPS por teléfono desde Madrid.

Ahora, establecido en la capital española, De Vega dice estar “plenamente convencido” de que el suyo fue un castigo ejemplarizante, por tratarse del corresponsal extranjero que más tiempo había pasado en Marruecos.

Este año se cumplen cuatro décadas desde que en 1975 este territorio del tamaño de Gran Bretaña fue anexionado por Rabat tras la retirada de España de su última colonia, la del Sahara Occidental.

Desde el alto el fuego firmado en 1991 entre Marruecos y el Frente Polisario, Rabat ha controlado casi todo el territorio, incluyendo toda la costa atlántica.

El Frente Polisario (Frente Popular de Liberación de Saguía al Hamra y Río de Oro) es la autoridad que la Organización de las Naciones Unidas (ONU) reconoce como representante legítimo del pueblo saharaui.

No obstante, la ONU todavía considera a Sahara Occidental como un “territorio en proceso inacabado de descolonización”.

Ahmed Ettanji señala un detalle en la pantalla a un colega de Equipe Media mientras editan un video obtenido durante una manifestación prosaharaui en El Aaiún, en la ocupada Sahara Occidental. Crédito: Karlos Zurutuza/IPS

Mohamed Mayara, también miembro del Equipe Media, acompaña a Ettanji en su búsqueda de azotea. Como la mayoría de sus colegas, Mayara reconoce haber sido detenido y torturado en varias ocasiones.

En cualquier caso, el constante acoso no parecer haber menoscabado su entusiasmo, aunque admite limitaciones que se suman a las inherentes a toda actividad clandestina.

“Creamos el primer grupo en 2009, pero la mayoría de nosotros trabajamos por puro instinto. No tenemos ninguna formación por lo que estamos aprendiendo periodismo sobre el terreno”, apunta este saharaui nacido el año de la invasión y que redacta los informes y comunicados de prensa en inglés y francés.

Su padre, dice, desapareció en manos del ejército marroquí dos meses después de su nacimiento. No ha sabido nada de él desde entonces.

Represión sostenida

La mayoría de los saharauis vive actualmente en los campamentos de refugiados de Tinduf, en Argelia occidental.

Los miembros del Equipe Media dicen mantener una “comunicación fluida” con la República Árabe Saharaui Democrática (RASD), la autoridad establecida allí y que reclama un territorio que en 75 por ciento está ocupado por Marruecos.

Además de compartir todo el material, también trabajan codo con codo junto a Hayat Khatari, la única periodista que informa abiertamente para la RASD TV, que emite desde Tinduf.

A sus 24 años, Khatari recuerda que empezó a trabajar en 2010 tras los incidentes del campamento de protesta de Gdeim Izzik, a las afueras de El Aaiún.

Originalmente levantado como un campamento de protesta pacífica, Gdeim Izzik desembocó en disturbios que se extendieron a otras ciudades saharauis cuando fue desmantelado por la fuerza marroquí el 8 de noviembre.

Analistas occidentales, como el estadounidense Noam Chomsky, atribuyen el origen de la llamada “primavera árabe” a El Aaiún, y no a Túnez, como comúnmente se ha establecido.

“Tenemos que trabajar muy duro y asumir muchísimos riesgos para poder contrarrestar la propaganda difundida por Rabat sobre todo lo que ocurre aquí”, subraya Khatari.

Hayat Khatari, la corresponsal en el ocupado Sahara Occidental de RASD TV, con la videocámara con la que registra la situación en El Aaiún. Crédito: Karlos Zurutuza/IPS

La joven activista recuerda que fue detenida por última vez en diciembre de 2014. A diferencia de Mahmood al Lhaissan, su predecesor en RASD TV, Khatari fue puesta en libertad poco después de su arresto.

En un informe publicado en marzo, Reporteros sin Fronteras recoge el caso de Al Lhaissan. El activista fue puesto en libertad provisional el 25 de febrero tras ocho meses en prisión por cubrir una manifestación.

Aún espera su juicio por cargos de participar en una “reunión armada,” obstruir la vía pública, daños a la propiedad y agredir a agentes de seguridad durante el desempeño de su labor.

En el mismo informe, Reporteros sin Fronteras también denuncia la detención y deportación en febrero de los periodistas franceses Jean-Louis Perez y Pierre Chautard.

Ambos trabajaban en un documental para la cadena de televisión France 3 sobre la situación económica y social en Marruecos, hasta que fueron detenidos y puestos en un vuelo a París tras serles confiscado todo su material.

El arresto se llevó a cabo en la Asociación Marroquí de Derechos Humanos, una de las principales organizaciones humanitarias del país pero a la que el Ministerio del Interior acusa de “socavar la labor de las fuerzas de seguridad”.

Asimismo, otras organizaciones como Amnistía Internacional y Human Rights Watch denuncian de forma constante violaciones de los derechos humanos sufridas por el pueblo saharaui a manos de Marruecos durante las últimas décadas.

a Saharawi woman demonstrator is dragged away by the police
a Saharawi woman demonstrator is dragged away by the police

A pesar de repetidas llamadas telefónicas y correos electrónicos, las autoridades marroquíes se negaron a responder a las preguntas de IPS sobre estas y otras violaciones de derechos humanos presuntamente cometidas en el Sahara Occidental.

De vuelta en el centro de El Aaiún, los activistas del Equipe Media parecen haber encontrado lo que buscaban. Los propietarios del apartamento elegido son una familia saharaui, como no podía ser de otra manera.

“Nunca pediríamos a un marroquí tal cosa”, acota Ettanji desde la azotea, y sin quitar la vista del escenario de la próxima protesta. La fecha y el lugar exactos, dice, no pueden desvelarlos “por razones obvias”.

IPS

Texto completo en: http://www.lahaine.org/rompiendo-el-bloqueo-informativo-en

One thought on “Breaking the media gag in Western Sahara”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s