Permaculture Project: reinvent ourselves

The Free best colour Jan22  2012. _Page_300_Image_0001Why start with: what permaculture means? Because many people don’t know what  it means, A lot of people think that it’s the normal agriculture with nothing different and that you are crazy because in this time of crisis, catastrophes and war you think only about nature and having some lush vegetables in your garden…but permaculture or synergistic agriculture, as you prefer, is not only a method to work the soil and have lush and sane vegetables but it’s above all “taking care of people”. Continue reading “Permaculture Project: reinvent ourselves”

Food Mythbusters: Small farms can feed the World

Food Mythbusters: Do we need industrial agriculture to feed the world?

from Grist with thanks

Are you tired of hearing claims that chemical-intensive monocultures are the only way to feed the planet’s growing population? With the first in her series of “mythbusting” videos, Anna Lappé, author of Diet for a Hot Planet and occasional Grist contributor, takes on this point directly.

She argues that, in fact, a network of small-scale, independent farms using diversified, sustainable practices and a shift in the way the food we already grow gets eaten will go a long way toward solving the problem without such a heavy reliance on corporate agriculture.

Take a look and tell us what you think.

(Did we mention that last week we had Food Day? Find food-related activities in your area here.) Continue reading “Food Mythbusters: Small farms can feed the World”

permaculture.. Farming without water

Millions Against Monsanto: The Food Fight of Our Lives
By Brie Mazurek     The Center for Urban Education about Sustainable Agriculture
Farmer David Little of Little Organic Farmgrows potatoes without irrigation in a dry part of California.This week, as the nation grapples with the worst drought in decades, the USDA added more than 218 counties to its list of natural disaster areas, bringing the total to 1,584 — more than half of all U.S. counties. Farmers in the Midwest and Great Plains have been the hardest hit, but the drought is a growing reality for farmers across the country, including California. While the secretary of agriculture won’t comment on the drought’s link to climate change, it’s at the forefront of everyone’s mind, and as global warming unfolds, knowledge of dryland agriculturewill become increasingly valuable.David Little of Little Organic Farm has had to adapt to water scarcity in California’s Marin and Sonoma counties, where most farmers and ranchers rely on their own reservoirs, wells, and springs, making them particularly vulnerable in years with light rainfall. Through a technique known as dry farming, Little’s potatoes and squash receive no irrigation, getting all of their water from the soil. Continue reading “permaculture.. Farming without water”