Berlin, Germany: Action Days Against Rent Madness Begin

Arson Attack Against Property Company Deutsche Wohnen

27.03.19: The Action Days Against Rent Madness have begun in earnest in Berlin with an arson attack against the vehicle fleet of property company Deutsche Wohnen.

The attack carried out by an Autonomous Groups cell destroyed 3 vehicles. The action days are part of an ongoing struggle against rising rents, lack of affordable housing and gentrification of working class districts. The campaign has involved a diverse set of tactics ranging from public demonstrations to militant direct action. Here is an excerpt from the claim of responsibility that was posted on German Indymedia:

“We dedicate the ashes of the three burned-out cars to all those affected by letters of termination, evictions and rent increases.

We devote the blazing flames to those who have been abandoned by the system, the victims of daily marginalization, and our fighting comrades, who are either in jail or on the run.”


Activists in Berlin want to seize 200K apartments from landlords

Campaign must first collect 170K signatures
March 28, 2019 08:00AM  [by  The Nation]Kevin Sun

“Expropriate Deutsche Wohnen and Co” founder Rouzbeh Taheri and Deutsche Wohnen apartments (Credit:Deutsche Wohnen and Berliner S-Bahn-Tisch)

“Are we heading back to socialism now?” asked Germany’s largest tabloid, Bild, earlier this month.

The reason? A referendum initiative in Berlin is seeking to expropriate 200,000 homes from the city’s biggest landlords and convert them into social housing, The Nation reports.

The proposal, known as “Expropriate Deutsche Wohnen and Co,” would affect a total of 10 companies, each of which owns at least 3,000 units in the rapidly-gentrifying German capital.

“Resistance against gentrification has grown so much stronger in the last 10 years. It has been proven that protest pays off,” the founder of the initiative, Rouzbeh Taheri, told The Nation.

The company specifically called out in the name of the proposal, Deutsche Wohnen, is Berlin’s largest private-property owner. Deutsche Bank founded the company in 1998, and it now owns 110,000 apartments in Berlin. Asset manager BlackRock owns more than a 10 percent stake in the company, making it Deutsche Wohnen’s largest shareholder.The official referendum campaign will begin next month, and will need to collect 170,000 signatures as a first step in the process. A long legal battle will likely follow, and the city would have to determine how much to pay the landlords as compensation. If approved, the referendum would be held sometime next year.

If the referendum succeeds, it would mark the first use in 70 years of Article 15 of the German Constitution, which allows for nationalization of private property.

The city of Berlin privatized about 200,000 units between 1989 and 2004, after the end of the Cold War. Rents have more than doubled in the past decade as the city has evolved into a world hipster capital.

The Berlin anti-gentrification movement has established ties with groups around the world, including anti-Amazon protesters in New York.

“We can learn from each other. And I hope we will talk soon about the socialization of Facebook, Google, and Amazon and others. But for now, in Berlin, it’s about housing companies,” said Nina Scholz, a Berlin-based journalist who supports the initiative.

[The Nation]Kevin Sun

Class War smash Qatari Royals and promote Protest Rights

Comment,

There’s something delicious about seeing very rich and powerful people take on a fight and then realise they’ve bitten off more than they can chew. They’re not used to it and sometimes seemingly small victories are the best we can hope for.

Last week Class War founder, Ian Bone, promoted globally on facebook the idea of redressing the balance on housing in London by occupying the Shard. There are multi million quid apartments in the building laying empty year and after year, meanwhile homelessness is on the rise and the vast majority of Grenfell survivors have still not been re-housed.

Before I go further I should say I’m part of Class War. My PhD research from the inside of the group has unearthed many examples of both the authorities and the media imagining that Class War just has to press a button somewhere and the unruly mob of thousands rises from the streets to literally devastate the avenues where the wealthy live. Class War are organising protests all the time and the size of a protest doesn’t really have an exact science behind it; some things take off and most things don’t. The vast majority of Class War events pass without any media interest. This means that when they do take off and large numbers attend a demo and boisterous things occur the police and others can look terribly inadequate so there has become a standard theme to policing Class War events: they send at least a van of cops along, hours in advance just in case, presumably with others on standby if they feel it necessary.

Continue reading “Class War smash Qatari Royals and promote Protest Rights”

US Millionaires Pass $1.500,000,000,000 Tax Cut for Rich

Every year wealth and power are concentrated in fewer and fewer hands.. HOW CAN WE STOP THIS MADNESS NOW?

“It’s immoral that many hardworking families will pay a higher tax bill or lose access to critical services like healthcare so that some CEO can get a bigger bonus and buy a bigger yacht.”     by  ¡ .. 34 Comments

 

By a vote of 227-205, Congressmen on Thursday passed a tax bill that would permanently cut taxes for massive corporations, reward the extremely wealthy by eliminating the estate tax, trigger billions of dollars in automatic cuts to Medicare, and raise taxes on millions of middle- and working-class families.

Continue reading “US Millionaires Pass $1.500,000,000,000 Tax Cut for Rich”

Since 1978 CEO Pay Has Soared by ‘Outrageous’ 937%

Worker Wages Flat but New analysis shows how corporate bosses rake in huge salaries and bonuses as inequality continues to soar …   by  Jake Johnson, staff writer   16 Comments

 (Photo: Fibonacci Blue/Flickr/cc)

Wages for most American workers have remained basically stagnant for decades, but a new report published on Thursday by the Economic Policy Institute (EPI) shows that the CEOs of America’s largest firms have seen their pay soar at a consistent and “outrageous” clip.

“Simply put, money that goes to the executive class is money that does not go to other people.”
—Lawrence Mishel, Economic Policy Institute

Between 1978 and 2016, CEO pay rose by 937 percent, EPI’s Lawrence Mishel and Jessica Schieder found. By contrast, the typical worker saw “painfully slow” compensation growth—11.2 percent over the same period.

Mishel and Schieder also note that CEOs of “America’s largest firms made an average of $15.6 million in compensation, or 271 times the annual average pay of the typical worker.”

“While the 2016 CEO-to-worker compensation ratio of 271-to-1 is down from 299-to-1 in 2014 and 286-to-1 in 2015, it is still light years beyond the 20-to-1 ratio in 1965 and the 59-to-1 ratio in 1989,” the report observes. “The average CEO in a large firm now earns 5.33 times the annual earnings of the average very-high-wage earner (earner in the top 0.1 percent).”

(Image Credit: Economic Policy Institute)(Image Credit: Economic Policy Institute)

EPI’s report is just the latest on an ever-expanding list of analyses documenting America’s staggering income inequality, which is the worst in the industrialized world. In March, the economists Thomas Piketty, Emmanuel Saez, and Gabriel Zucman labeled the U.S. inequality crisis—the massive gap between the wealthiest and everyone else—”a tale of two countries.”

“For the 117 million US adults in the bottom half of the income distribution, growth has been non-existent for a generation, while at the top of the ladder it has been extraordinarily strong,” Piketty, Saez, and Zucman wrote.

Mishel points out that the vast disparity between CEO pay and average worker compensation, which EPI documents annually, “is a major driver of inequality.”

“Simply put, money that goes to the executive class is money that does not go to other people. Rising executive pay is not connected to overall growth in the economic pie,” Mishel argues. “We could curtail the explosive growth in CEO pay without doing any harm to the economy.”

EPI proposes several policies that would curtail executive pay and potentially put more money into the pockets of workers, including “higher marginal income tax rates at the very top” and higher taxes for companies with high CEO-to-worker pay ratios.

The Trump administration, however, has indicated that it intends to do precisely the opposite. President Donald Trump’s proposed tax policies, a recent analysis found, would provide massive cuts for the rich while hiking taxes for many middle class families.

For this reason—and simply because of “history and greed”—Mishel told The Guardian he “fully expect[s] CEO compensation to escalate in the near future.”

30,000 Massacred by Tory cuts in Health and Social Care

Elected by a minority the UK Tory party revel in robbing, squeezing and in this case killing the population to benefit the established ruling class. The UK is a toxic blend of institutions, parties, schools, law, work, prisons, property, police, family,  etc. which mould our minds and have always blocked all chance of revolution.. ……but OUR TIME WILL COME

 http://www.ox.ac.uk/      Researchers (published by the Royal Society of Medicine) exploring why there has been a substantial increase in mortality in England and Wales in 2015 conclude that failures in the health and social care system linked to disinvestment are likely to be the main cause.

There were 30,000 excess deaths in 2015, representing the largest increase in deaths in the post-war period. The excess deaths, which included a large spike in January that year, were largely in the older population who are most dependent on health and social care.

see also.. Saving the #NHS from Trump and May Continue reading “30,000 Massacred by Tory cuts in Health and Social Care”

Eat the Rich: the most overpaid CEOs in US

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Meet the most overpaid CEOs in America    By Katie Herzog

Damn, it feels good to be a CEO.

Unlike everyone else in the world, executives have seen pay increases of an astonishing 997 percent over the past 36 years. Think about that for a second: While you’re struggling to afford the payments on your used Volvo, your boss’s boss’s boss’s boss has gotten raises of nearly 1,000 percent. It’s such a ludicrous statistic that is seems fake. And yet, it’s not.top_25_top_overpaid_20161

And who is the most overpaid of this highly overpaid population? As You Sow, a nonprofit that promotes corporate social responsibility through shareholder advocacy, has released its annual ranking of the 100 most overpaid CEOs — those who earn a great deal of money but aren’t necessarily doing a great job. While their names might not be familiar to you, their companies will be.

Drumroll, please.

Not only are these numbers obscenely high, the really crazy part is that CEO compensation is in no way linked to how well the company performs. Take No. 4, for instance, the CEOs of Chipotle, a company that is currently giving away free burritos in an attempt to claw its way out of a PR crisis: Both Chipotle’s stock and sales are down, but its CEOs made $57 million last year. Sounds fair.nyahem

It’s not just Chipotle. In fact, studies show that the more a CEO is paid, the worse the company performs. That was certainly true of last year’s most overpaid CEO, Anthony Petrello of Nabors Industries, who is notably absent from this year’s list. Petrello’s compensation was nearly $70 million in 2014; in 2015, Nabors — a natural gas company — saw such a decline in value that it was actually removed from the S&P 500 and cut nearly 3,500 jobs$70 million can buy you a CEO, it seems, but that CEO can’t make you a profit.ranchomirage

This year’s list includes ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson, who comes in at No. 8 with a cool $33 million in compensation. Climate crime pays, it would seem.

In the meantime, the poverty rate in the U.S. continues to hover around 15 percent. That means almost 47 million Americans live on less than $24,000 a year — about as much as this year’s most overpaid CEO “earns” over one leisurely lunch.protest_DSC_8813

“Everyone wants to be properly compensated for the work they do — it is part of the American dream and bedrock of the capitalist system,” said As You Sow CEO Andrew Behar. “However, as shown in this report, the process which determines CEO pay is broken.”

And maybe — just maybe — the system is too.

submedia.tv…. SINK THE RICH.. and Share the Loot!

sink the rich

This week we examine the contradictory notion of “Anarcho-Capitalism” and dismantle this illogical concept by illustrating current examples of why free markets have nothing to do with freedom. On the music break, San Diego based MC Odessa Kane with “GPT”

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